top of page

What Causes Bad Breath and How to Treat It

Nearly everyone occasionally experiences terrible breath. However, some people find it difficult to resolve their daily problems with bad breath. One-third of people claim to have bad breath in some fashion.


Halitosis, "bad breath," typically occurs after a meal containing much garlic or immediately after waking up. Additionally, temporary halitosis can be brought on by drinking alcohol or coffee and smoking cigarettes.

Halitosis, "bad breath," typically occurs after a meal containing much garlic or immediately after waking up. Additionally, temporary halitosis can be brought on by drinking alcohol or coffee and smoking cigarettes.


It can be embarrassing and unsettling for some people to learn that they have terrible breath from a friend, family member, or coworker because they may not know it. In extreme cases, bad breath and foul body odor can damage a person's quality of life and ability to communicate with others.



What causes bad breath?


Bad breath can come from both within and outside the mouth. The two leading causes of foul breath are bacteria on the teeth and debris on the tongue. The majority of halitosis instances are associated with poor oral hygiene, gum disorders including gingivitis and periodontitis, and dry mouth—a condition in which the salivary glands are unable to produce enough saliva to keep your mouth moist—should therefore come as no surprise. A visit to the dentist could aid in ruling out periodontal disease and identify any oral issues that could be the source of bad breath.


Tonsillitis, respiratory diseases such as sinusitis or bronchitis, and some gastrointestinal ailments can bring various types of bad breath. Advanced liver or renal disease, uncontrolled diabetes, or both might cause unpleasant breath. People should seek medical help in these situations since they will likely experience severe symptoms and bad breath.

Tonsillitis, respiratory diseases such as sinusitis or bronchitis, and some gastrointestinal ailments can bring various types of bad breath. Advanced liver or renal disease, uncontrolled diabetes, or both might cause unpleasant breath. People should seek medical help in these situations since they will likely experience severe symptoms and bad breath.


Sometimes, even when their breath is objectively perfect, people think they have bad breath. The medical term for this is pseudo-halitosis. Despite a doctor's reassurance, halitophobia, or the dread of having bad breath, is an actual ailment that can persist. For those with pseudo-halitosis, comfort is helpful, and they might benefit from speaking with a therapist or psychiatrist familiar with the illness.


A patient who complains of poor breath might be evaluated by a Primary Care Physician (PCP). The oral examination and thorough medical and dental history are the doctor's first steps. Tests can be run to confirm the presence of halitosis by assessing the severity of bad breath on a scale and using equipment to discover particular components connected to halitosis. The degree of malodor can be evaluated using the tongue, a piece of dental floss, or a device like a night guard. The doctor often smells the air that the patient exhales via their mouth or nose.



Your PCP could advise scheduling an appointment with a dentist if there is evidence of tooth or gum issues, which are the most frequent causes of bad breath. Arrangements with different medical specialists are appropriate when an underlying medical issue demands to care.


Here are a few Tips for lessening bad breath


The advice provided below will assist you in lessening foul breath:

Visit the dentist often. Remember that oral factors cause the majority of cases of bad breath!

Tip 1:

After meals, brush your teeth at least twice daily with fluoridated toothpaste.


Tip 2:

Avoid using tobacco products and chewing tobacco.


Tip 3:

Visit the dentist often. Remember that oral factors cause the majority of cases of bad breath!


Tip 4:

Use over-the-counter moisturizing products, such as a dry mouth spray, rinses, or dry mouth moisturizing gel; if you have a dry mouth, rinse and gargle with an alcohol-free mouthwash before night. If you see no improvement, schedule a consultation with a specialist in oral medicine. Oral medicine specialists provide comprehensive care for a variety of conditions, including mucosal infections, issues with the salivary glands, orofacial pain syndromes, and side effects of cancer treatments.



 

References:

bottom of page